Sumatriptan Effective in a Range of Headache and Migraine

July 12, 2009 by dean · Leave a Comment 

One hundred and fourteen patients were diagnosed as migraine, 76 as tension-type headache, and 42 were not able to be classified according to the International Headache Society’s diagnostic criteria.

Ninety six per cent of migraineurs responded to sumatriptan, whilst it was effective in 97% and 95% of tension headache sufferers and unclassifiable headaches respectively .

This response clearly demonstrates that there is a common underlying mechanism for a range of headache and migraine conditions – and the recent research suggests that it is a sensitised brainstem – and the action of sumatriptan? It desensitises the brainstem.

A thorough examination of the upper neck will either confirm of negate cervical disorders as the sensitising source.

Cheers

Dean

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About dean
Consultant Headache & Migraine Physiotherapist; International Teacher; Director, The Headache Clinic & Watson Headache Institute; PhD Candidate Murdoch University, Western Australia; Adjunct Lecturer, Masters Program, Physiotherapy School, University of South Australia; MAppSc(Res) GradDipAdvManipTher Experienced health practitioners trained in the Watson Headache Approach perform the examination and treatment techniques developed by Dean Watson. These techniques are based on his extensive experience of 7000 headache patients (21,000 hours) over 21 years and are now taught internationally. For your nearest practitioner who has completed training in the ‘Watson Headache Approach’ please refer to the ‘Practitioner Directory’.

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