Menstrual Migraine

July 31, 2009 by Dean Watson · Leave a Comment 

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How to Best Manage Menstrual Migraine

July 30, 2009 by dean · Leave a Comment 

Given that hormonal patterns and fluctuations of menstrual migraine sufferers are no different to women who do not experience headache it is not surprising that, after an extensive review of hormonal treatments, it was concluded that hormonal treatment should not be the first choice of treatment. The common goal of this approach is to minimise fluctuation in oestrogen levels, however evidence regarding the effectiveness of this approach is lacking …. clearly a different approach is needed.

Cheers

Dean

(Davies PT, Eccles N, Steiner TJ, Leathard H, Rose F. Plasma estrpgen, progesterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels in the pathogenesis of migraine. Cephalalgia 1989;9143[abstract]

Epstein MT, Hockaday JM, Hockaday TD. Migraine and reproductive hormones throughout the menstrual cycle. Lancet 1975;1(1706):543-548

Loder E et al. Hormonal management of migraine associated with menses and the menopause: a clinical review. Headache 2007 Feb;47(2):239-40)

© 2009 & Beyond. Watson Headache Institute, All Rights Reserved.

Identifying Headache and Migraine

July 29, 2009 by Dean Watson · Leave a Comment 

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‘Triptans’, Hormones, and Menstrual Migraine.

June 21, 2009 by dean · Leave a Comment 

The ‘triptans’ are effective in relieving menstrual migraine

The ‘triptans’ are effective in relieving menstrual migraine

The ‘triptans’ are effective in relieving menstrual migraine – how (?) – isn’t menstrual migraine caused by hormones – specifically a drop in oestrogen? Research showing that hormonal patterns and fluctuations are no different in women suffering menstrual migraine from those who don’t, suggests that this is not the case, and has prompted some authorities to suggest that there is an underlying disorder in the central nervous system. Managing menstrual migraine by artificially controlling normal hormonal fluctuations, therefore, whilst helping to ease symptoms in some women, is not addressing the underlying problem.

Could it be that the underlying problem is a sensitised brainstem (?) – after all the ‘triptans’ desensitise the brainstem.

Cheers

Dean

(Hoskin KL, Kaube H, Goadsby PJ. Sumatriptan can inhibit trigeminal afferents by an exclusively neural mechanism. Brain1996; 119:1419-28

Loder E. Menstrual migraine. Curr Treat Options Neurol 2001 Mar;3(2):189-200

Mannix LK, Files JA. The use of triptans in the management of menstrual migraine. CNS Drugs 2005;19(11): 951-72

Martin VT, Behbehani M. Ovarian hormones and migraine headache: understanding mechanisms and patohogenesis – part 2. Headache 2006;46:365-386

Varlibas A, Erdemoglu Ak. Altered trigeminal system excitability in menstrual migraine patients. The Journal of Headache and Pain 2009; 10(4):277-282)

© 2009 & Beyond. Watson Headache Institute, All Rights Reserved.