The Uncertainty of Treating Migraine

August 21, 2009 by dean · Leave a Comment 

“ … little does it concern the patient that there is an underlying cause … if the practitioner is unable to relieve his pain.” (Persian Avicienna – Critchley 1967)

This statement was made 2000 years ago and remains true today – patients are seeking treatment, but since the cause of migraine remains unclear, treatment is provided on a less than solid scientific foundation, on a ‘we’ll try this and see what affect it has’ basis.

However what is becoming increasingly clear (except to those who continue to support the notion that headache and migraine are separate entities) is that headache and migraine arise from the same (sensitised brainstem) disorder – the evidence is there – this is the underlying cause. Not only can we confirm relevant neck disorders as the source but we can offer a way of addressing it, based not on guesswork but on sound scientific evidence.

Cheers

Dean

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© 2009 & Beyond. Watson Headache Institute, All Rights Reserved.

About dean
Consultant Headache & Migraine Physiotherapist; International Teacher; Director, The Headache Clinic & Watson Headache Institute; PhD Candidate Murdoch University, Western Australia; Adjunct Lecturer, Masters Program, Physiotherapy School, University of South Australia; MAppSc(Res) GradDipAdvManipTher Experienced health practitioners trained in the Watson Headache Approach perform the examination and treatment techniques developed by Dean Watson. These techniques are based on his extensive experience of 7000 headache patients (21,000 hours) over 21 years and are now taught internationally. For your nearest practitioner who has completed training in the ‘Watson Headache Approach’ please refer to the ‘Practitioner Directory’.

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